Tags

, ,

My Store and Stitch Needlebook

I have mentioned in a previous post how much I love the Japanese Tulip embroidery needles. They are the best I have ever used and I seem to have quite the collection of these needles now – but they are not cheap – so I have been thinking about how to best store them.

57C674E4-9E7E-43D5-A30C-C824B6EE0D14

Tulip ‘store and stitch’ Needlebook

My normal practice with any of my embroidery needles is to leave the original needles in their packaging  until I use one. When I finish stitching I move this needle into a needlebook to keep until the next use. I often keep the package of unused needle in the back of the needlebook as this helps me remember the brand, type and size of the needles I have used.

The difference with the Tulip needles is that come in small glass tubes rather than packets – so a new needle book design was needed.

18BD3556-A34C-4162-8CA8-08E858DF7E2E

Back cover folded in over needle Tubes

You will see from the photos that for my design of a special Tulip Needles needlebook I added an additional length of fabric to the back cover of the needlebook so that I could fold this flap inside the back cover. I then stitched small fabric pockets on this flap to store the glass Tulip tubes in. The flap keeps the small tubes safe and allows me to have fresh needles at hand.

351C6E34-8874-4B02-A146-95CF988E7A9E

Felted wool pages to store used needles

I still love these needles and believe they are worth paying the higher price, though a warning they are VERY sharp. I hope my needlebook design inspires you to solve you needle storage in a way that suits your stitching style.

3E841C90-1F4D-4128-8CFA-32ACE58F33A8

Front cover with a little embroidery and a T so I remember these are Tulip needles!

Advertisements